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'Tis the season to network.

December 8, 2017

The holiday season is in full swing. Whether we personally celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, (or nothing in particular), one thing is true: year-end events occur in our professional worlds. Organizations tend to gather in the month of December, not for decision-making meetings necessarily, but to be together as a group and reflect on the year. I would guess you’re already starting to see some of these annual events popping up on your calendar.


Amidst the fun of ugly sweater contests, white elephant gift exchanges, and group photos, these gatherings provide lots of opportunities to network with people we might not see at any other time of year. By taking the time to genuinely connect and catch up with these folks, it’s a great opportunity to remind them of what we’re about and deepen our connection to them.


To help you make the most of this season’s many events, here are 5 tips for your holiday networking:

1) Offer to help. If possible, extend a helping hand to assist with planning the event, greeting guests as they arrive, or cleaning up afterwards. Helping with an important element that makes the event a success will not only strengthen your bond with the organization, but you’ll gain some positive visibility as well.


2) Participate. If it’s ugly sweaters, wear one. If it’s a white elephant gift exchange, bring something. By participating in the theme of the event, we become more approachable and demonstrate our commitment to the group. And if the opportunity presents itself down the road, being able to reminisce on the ugliest sweater can make for a great ice-breaker. 😊


3) Indulge intelligently. Of course, feel free to enjoy a glass of wine or a cocktail if you choose. Avoid treating it like a college kegger, however. You don’t want to have made a great connection only to immediately damage it by not being able to remember the details of the conversation, or worse, doing or saying something you’ll later regret.


4) Meet someone new. Sometimes it’s tough to do, but challenge yourself to introduce yourself to at least one person you don’t already know. If initiating a conversation is not your favorite thing (and for many folks it’s not!) make it easier on yourself by briefly introducing yourself and then asking a question to engage the other person. Something along the lines of, “So, how did you get involved with XYZ Organization?” will be simple for them to answer and open the door to a nice exchange.


5) Follow up when appropriate. If you do make a new and potentially beneficial connection this month be sure not to let it slip away in the busy-ness of the season. Put a reminder in your calendar to reach back out in the new year, and then be sure to do so. You will stand out as someone who is organized and sincere, two traits that are always valued in the world of work.


Your career development assignment: You guessed it! Try using one, two or all five of these tips at your next holiday event. Doing so will help insure you can fully reap the benefit of your involvement with the organization as well as potentially lead to new opportunities in 2018.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


REMEMBER: It's absolutely possible to discover a career & life you love. I'm rooting for you!! :)


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Finding time for what's important.

December 1, 2017

Busy. It’s the only word that really describes the past few weeks. Don’t get me wrong, it’s been a really “good” busy! I had a booth at the Brava Women’s Expo two weeks ago, hosted family for the Thanksgiving holiday, and started a new counseling opportunity with a local non-profit. In addition, I’ve continued with my regular networking activities and worked with my amazing clients. Like I said, a “good” busy. 


But... I haven't posted a blog article in the past two weeks. Believe me, it wasn't because I didn't want to. Time constraints simply got the best of me. If I’m being really honest, getting this one ready and out took some juggling and I decided to use a pre-dawn writing session fueled by my favorite roast of coffee 😊.


As I was reflecting about the tip I wanted to share in this week’s newsletter, I realized time, or more to the point, feeling like there isn’t enough of it, has been a theme of late not just for me, but for many of the folks I’ve been talking with.


Time is a precious commodity for most professionals I know. We balance careers, time with family, kid’s activities, volunteering in our community, etc., and the things we need and want to do for ourselves easily get pushed to the side (if you’ve ever skipped going to the gym because of workload, or kiddos needing something, you know what I mean).


When the day is already overflowing with things we need to do, it can seem like a tall order to squeeze in another thing. Sometimes, making a career change falls into the “another thing” category and we don’t take steps to make it happen. Again, not because we don’t want to. Simply because we feel there isn’t time.


And let’s face it, making a thoughtful career change - one that will bring deeper meaning to our lives and fit well with the lifestyle we want to create - can be time consuming. There is company research that needs to happen. Resumes that could use a rewrite. Linkedin profiles that need keyword optimization. Networking events to attend. Cover letters to compose, and interviews to prepare for. The conundrum becomes, how will we ever find the time to do all of these things when I’m already stretched to the limit??


I want you to know, I hear you! I like to think I organize my time well, but the past two weeks have reminded me that even with blocks of time set aside in my color-coded calendar, it is still possible to “run out of time” for important things. So what do we do??


I think the answer, while not necessarily easy, is simple: we can carve out the time we need by consciously pausing other activities.

For example, I tend to be an early riser and am typically up before dawn so I have time for meditation, journaling, and yoga and still get my boys to school on time. Now I know getting up early isn’t for everyone! But for me, this works, and I have come to really enjoy this time each day.


Knowing that I would be up early anyway, today I decided to reallocate this time for writing. The result, for me, is worth the shift: my newsletter is getting written and will be back on track as scheduled. A temporary adjustment with a huge reward.


Your career development assignment: What are the temporary adjustments you could make in your schedule that will reward you the time you need for career change activities? Is it early morning, when your brain is fresh and you can edit your resume without distractions? Possibly mid-day, when you could do some company research during your lunch break (because you would go online anyway)? Or perhaps in the evening, and by recording your favorite show to watch over the weekend you have time to attend an industry networking event?


The possibilities, when we start to look for them, are limitless. It might be challenging at first to find these spots in our schedule, and we might need to get creative, but I would bet these opportunities exist in your schedule, maybe even hiding in plain sight.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


REMEMBER: It's absolutely possible to discover a career & life you love. I'm rooting for you!! :)


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Take your resume to the next level.

November 10, 2017

If you are getting ready to embark on any kind of a career change, probably one of the first thoughts that came to your mind was, “Oh my gosh! I need to update my resume!”


It's a great first thought to have. After all, your resume is one of your key pieces of marketing materials as you’re marketing yourself to prospective employers.


One of the things I see a lot in resumes is taking on the “to-do” list kind of format. This doesn’t make a resume "bad" necessarily, but it does hold it back from being great.


What do I mean? 


You start by listing your job title, company name, and then a bulleted list of all of the tasks that you did in that position. When that's done, you move onto the next job title, company name, and bulleted list of tasks. Alot of resumes go that far, but don’t go much farther. Again, this doesn’t make it a “bad” resume per se. But, when a resume is kept to this really traditional pattern, it’s not really representing the job seeker as fully and compellingly as it possibly could.


Taking your resume from “Ok” to “AWESOME!” is actually really simple. In this week’s video (above), I’m sharing how simple it is to take your resume to the next level so you can really stand out to potential employers. 


Think about all of your past positions, at least over the past 10 years or so, and instead of thinking about just the different tasks you did there (because of course those are important) but I want you to think about the things that you accomplished in those positions.


You want to go beyond saying, “I used Excel to create spreadsheets.” Take it a step further and say, “I used Excel to streamline a process which saved my department 20 hours per month.” Of course time saved equates to $$ saved, and anytime we can quantify our accomplishments from a former position (like saving the company money), a future employer will love to see that.


Your career development assignment: Take your existing resume, go beyond the task list, and start to incorporate the accomplishments you’ve had in your previous positions.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


REMEMBER: It's absolutely possible to discover a career & life you love. I'm rooting for you!! :)


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Unhappy at work? Your job may not be the culprit.

November 3, 2017

Are you working in a job that you once really enjoyed, maybe even loved, but now you find yourself dreading going to work on Monday? You might not know exactly when or why this shift occurred, but sitting here today, you know that it has. You might even be wondering, “what the heck happened?”


Sometimes this occurs when we simply grow tired or bored with what we are doing day in, day out. In these instances, our "Monday morning dread" is likely related to that boredom and it’s probably time to consider a new job or overall career direction.



However, sometimes, it’s NOT the job itself. In this week’s video (above) I’m sharing how stacking up your personal values against those of your company can be a window into what’s making you miserable at work. 


If we can honestly say we still have interest in the type of work we do, or the population of clients we serve, it’s possible that what’s going on has to do with our personal values being out of alignment with the values of the organization we work for.


Perhaps it’s not that you hate compiling that data, calling on those accounts, or training the new recruits. Perhaps it’s that you don’t agree with the methods being utilized, the techniques being trained, or the way compensation is determined. Having to do your job in this way feels “wrong” to you, and being asked to operate outside of your integrity is actually what’s making you miserable.


Your career development assignment: Find a quiet space and period of time when you can be uninterrupted. Really think about what it is that you value. Is it time off to travel or volunteer in your child’s classroom? Is it being compensated more often and based on your productivity, rather than solely because it’s annual review time? Is it working for an organization whose products and services, in your opinion, impact the community in a positive way? Take out your pen and paper and write all of these down.


Next, compare your personal values with those of the company. Do you see similarities or a lot of mismatch? It’s important to be a hard grader here. If a majority of the values listed don’t match up, you’ve likely uncovered the source of your Monday morning dread. Armed with this information, you can take the next step toward a more satisfying job and career by seeking out an organization that better aligns with you and what you value.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


REMEMBER: It's absolutely possible to discover a career & life you love. I'm rooting for you!! :)


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Give yourself permission to dream

October 27, 2017

It's been just about 9 years since I began working in career services. Over the course of those years I’ve had the opportunity - the privilege - to work with literally 100’s of job seekers.


In that time (as recently as the past week) I’ve noticed a certain theme comes up so often for people at the initial stages of career development. It goes along the lines of, “I'm not sure I can do something new. I’ve been doing what I do for so long. How could I possibly – at this point in my life - do something new?”



This week, I wanted to share how a little daydreaming can go a long way to removing this obstacle. You see, if we allow the conversation to stop with the question above, quite literally, any chance at forward progress will stop. Why? Because the question points to a certain truth: the path to a new career is not immediately clear. However, the way does exist. The way is possible.


The first step is not to figure out how in the world you would get from here to there. This isn’t where we start. If we start here, we will never move forward.Instead, we want to start with, "What can I imagine?" When we ask ourselves this question - BOOM - we can start to make some strides. We can start to understand our heart’s desire. We can start to believe that maybe, just maybe, there could be another path for us, one that leads to genuine career and life satisfaction.


Your assignment: do a little day-dreaming around your ideal career. What comes up for you? You might be surprised to find that it’s much more realistic and attainable than you first thought.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


It's absolutely possible to discover a career & life you love. I'm rooting for you!! :)


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Why inspiration is key to your job search

October 20, 2017

Job searching can be tough. My question for you today is: “How do you stay inspired?” This is the same question I ask my clients when we are getting ready to launch into their specific job search strategy.


As you probably know all too well yourself, job searching can take longer than we think (or want) it to take. There can be disappointments along the way that we don’t anticipate. As a result, it’s easy to get the wind knocked out of our sails leaving us wanting to quit the search all together.

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If you ever get to a point where your job search has knocked the proverbial wind out of your sails and you want to quit, I want to encourage you to resist that urge! Stay the course.


In this week's video (above), I am sharing how a reliable source of inspiration can make all the difference between a job search that is successful, and one that isn’t.


I also want to share one of my personal "tried and true" sources of inspiration. It's a piece of prose I found over 20 years ago now (in a newspaper !!). I've uploaded it right below this blog post.


Bottom line: don’t quit the search. The negative impact on our health and relationships from staying in a job we don’t love has a ripple effect. We owe it to ourselves, and to those around us, to find work that fulfills and satisfies us. I'm rooting for you!! :)


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Do you dread Monday morning?

October 13, 2017

Are you ready to make a change in your career?


You know you are not feeling the passion you once did...

You are burnt out...

And (quite frankly) you just dread Monday mornings...


The problem is, you’ve been doing what you do for so long it’s a challenge to imagine how you would ever make the leap from where you are now to where you would like to be. Perhaps you’d like to find yourself in a new level, position, or even industry?

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If that describes your situation, I want to share a concept with you that can help you go from feeling like this is an impossible task to one that is realistic and doable: transferable skills.  


If the concept of transferable skills is familiar to you, great! If not, these are simply various skills we’ve developed over time, probably have a lot of mastery over, and are applicable to multiple industries and multiple roles. A great example of a transferable skill is customer service. We need it at every level in our organizations and it’s something we can hone and develop at one level and then transfer onto a new level/position/industry.


If you dread Monday mornings but feel trapped in your current job, I would like to encourage you to leverage your transferable skills. You can start by doing two things: first, make an exhaustive list of all of the skills you believe you bring to the table, and second, identify the skills potentially transferable in nature.


In addition to customer service, other great examples include management, problem solving, and conflict resolution. All of these can be developed in many different kinds of roles and industries, and are absolutely transferable to new/different roles and industries.

Employers love to see that we understand and can communicate how the skills we have can be transferred and utilized in the role that they are looking to fill.


Your “homework:” Make an exhaustive list of your skills; identify the ones universal in nature; and think about how you would specifically apply the skill you have to the position you would like to move into.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Who loves job interviews?

October 6, 2017

OK – raise your hand if you LOVE going to job interviews. 

(I bet you didn’t raise your hand). 😉

Don’t worry! You are not alone.


Most people, if given the choice between going through a job interview to get their next job, or NOT having to go through one, would opt to not have to go through one. Especially if it’s been a while since you’ve been on a job interview, the idea of being asked questions and saying something “stupid”, or otherwise embarrassing ourselves is something that most of us would prefer to avoid.

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The reality is, as you know, that job interviews are the gateway to nearly every employment opportunity along our career path. So, if we are ready and want to take the next step in our career, it’s absolutely essential that we get to a point that we feel comfortable with our job interviewing skills.


In this week’s video (above), I’m sharing one thing you can do to right now to improve your job interviewing skills. In my many years of working in career services, one of the things I’ve noticed that most people need help with is their level of confidence around the skills they bring to the table. I think what happens is – when we do what we do for so long – it becomes second nature to us and we start to downplay the importance and significance of it.


We think, “Well, of course I can do that – can’t everyone do that?” The reality is, “No! Not everyone can do that!” But YOU can.


If you are getting prepared for a job interview and finding yourself thinking your skills are not that great or special, I want to encourage you to STOP making that statement to yourself. Instead, replace that statement with, “You know, it IS really great and awesome that I can do this thing. And, I can do it in a way that is really unique because of ‘XYZ’.”


Your "homework:" Practice talking about your skills and experience with a ton more confidence than you are used to – and maybe even comfortable with. When you do, you will naturally come across as a confident and compelling applicant that any employer would love to have on their team. 


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Thinking of returning to work?

September 29, 2017

Have you been out of the workforce for a while, but are thinking it might be time to make a return? Perhaps you chose to stay home with young children for a few years? Or, perhaps you were caring for an elderly parent or loved one?


If that describes your situation, I can imagine you may be feeling a little bit scared about returning to the workforce and engaging in a job search. When I was home with my kiddos

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for a couple of years and had a little daycare, I really loved that period of my life. But, when my boys went to preschool, I realized it was time for me to step into the next phase of my career as well. In this week’s video (above), I’m sharing a simple step you can take right now to begin to quell that fear and start feeling competent and ready to reengage the world of work. 


I want to encourage you to think about what you have to offer this next employer. Even when we’ve been out of the workforce, we’ve still been engaged in skill-building, had lots of responsibilities, and those skills and talents are valid, and worthwhile. When we present those skills and talents to an employer appropriately and compellingly, they will be able to see, in fact, we have a lot to offer. We DO have what it takes to be an employee again.


Your assignment: think about what is the one thing that you are really scared of about returning to work. Is it the thought of doing a job search because you haven’t done one in a long time? Are you worried you’ll be seen as a “phony” and don’t have the skills anymore?


Once you have your main fear identified, it’s time to recognize that it’s a myth. You can absolutely overcome whatever that obstacle is! You can learn to job search again; you can brush up on your skills again. You CAN and ARE a valuable candidate, just as you are RIGHT NOW. By identifying that fear and systematically debunking that myth, you will automatically increase your confidence. When you do sit at the interview table, you will be a much more compelling and confident candidate, which is what all employers are looking for. 


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Are your goals on the back burner?

September 22, 2017

Welcome to Fall!  It’s September 22nd, which means it is officially the start of the fall season, which means we are officially just about 3 months away from the close of 2017…


I know what you’re thinking: “Where has the year gone??” (I know because I’m thinking it too!) 😉  

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We often get so busy in our daily lives – taking the kiddos to soccer practice, or volunteering, or something else that keeps us busy, busy, busy – and it’s easy to put our own personal and professional development goals on the back burner. 


In this week’s video (above), I’m inviting you to put your goals back on the front burner, where they belongMy sincere hope is for you to find yourself on December 31st with a great big smile on your face, knowing you did the "thing" that you need to do in order to move yourself and your career forward in a way that brings you joy, fulfillment, and satisfaction. You deserve nothing less.


Your career development assignment: This week, I invite you to think about what needs to shift in your life so that you can take that next step? Where do you need to balance out your time now, so that you can have the time you need to invest in yourself in the way that you want?


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Feeling stuck due to the "wrong" education and experience?

September 15, 2017

Do you feel stuck where you are professionally? Do you wish you could take your career in a new direction, but you feel like the education and experience you have don’t support where you would like to take your career next? If you could, you might “rewind the clock” and tell your younger self to pick a different major or get a different internship, so that by the time you are 

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where you are today, you would have the education and experience you feel you need? If that describes your situation, this week’s video (above) is for you. Watch it now and learn how the following two things can help you move past this feeling of “stuckness.”


The first thing you can do is simply embrace the education and experience you do have. Regardless of the degree or experience, they both helped us develop critical thinking and communication skills. Not to mention, we’ve likely built a nice network of friends and colleagues that can help us move forward in a new direction, even if it’s outside of the industry we are currently serving in.


Secondly, think about whether you truly need additional education and experience. Sometimes it’s true that we do, but sometimes it’s more a matter of learning to communicate differently about what we do have to offer. You see, it isn’t always that we need “more.” We may simply need to learn to communicate our education and experience in a more compelling and employer-attractive way. It’s possible to differentiate ourselves from the competition by building up our confidence in what we bring to the table, which includes our existing education and experience. 


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Is it time for a career change?

September 8, 2017

“How does someone 'know' it’s the right time to make a change in their career?” 


This question came at the end of a presentation I gave earlier this week at one of my regular networking meetings. What a great question to receive! So good, I decided to devote this week’s message to answering it. :)


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As I thought about how to best answer this question, I reflected back on my own experience and how I knew it was time to make a career change. Over the course of my career there have been two points where I’ve made a significant shift in the direction I was going to take my career. Both times, two things were true: 1) it was a hard decision to make, and 2) (interestingly) it wasn't because I "hated" my jobs.


You may be feeling the same way I was. In this week’s video (above), I'm sharing how I knew it was time.  


What it boiled down to each time was that my career was out of alignment with other important priorities in my life. I didn’t “hate” the jobs themselves. BUT … I wasn’t able to have the life I wanted because of the jobs. As a young mom, it was the inability to prioritize my young family the way I wanted and needed (job #1), and later, (job #2), it was the lack of professional development opportunities going forward. I realized each time that these weren’t things I could live with over the long term.


Your career development assignment: This week, as we are settling into a new school year and helping our kiddos be successful so that they have a big and bright future, I invite you to ask yourself this question: “Is what I’m doing in my career right now allowing me to have the life that I want to live, and leading me toward the big and bright future that I know I want, and deserve, for myself?” 


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page, an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Labor Day and the ripple effect of gratitude.

September 1, 2017

Labor Day Fun Fact: According to the Department of Labor’s website, the very first Labor Day holiday was celebrated in 1882 in New York. (As an American worker, I’m personally grateful to those who founded the holiday that we have been able to enjoy for well over a century!)


Feeling grateful for the holiday got me thinking about the 

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gratitude I also have for several of my professional mentors. It’s safe to say that, without their positive influence, I would not be where I am today professionally. In this week’s video (above), I’m sharing how expressing gratitude to the mentors in your life not only has a positive impact on them, but also on you and your continued professional development.


An expression of gratitude does not need to be fancy; it just needs to be heartfelt. Connect with your important mentors through a quick email, a LinkedIn message, or a short hand-written note and simply thank them for the positive impact they’ve made. Not only will you make their day, but you will further enhance an already great relationship. The positive effects of your action will continue to ripple through your ongoing professional development.


Your career development assignment: As you are enjoying this holiday weekend, I encourage you to reflect on the mentors in your life. How have they made a difference for you? Make a plan to reach out to them in the coming weeks and let them know. 


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page , an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Don't just set a goal - achieve it!

August 25, 2017

It’s “back to school” season again! Even though I’m no longer a "traditional" student, there is something about this time of year that gets me thinking about setting goals. In fact, I’ve been talking with my two boys (an incoming high school Junior and Freshman) about their goals for the upcoming school year. Things like, what GPA would they like to finish the year with, or, what new activities would they like to try? It's been great to hear some of their ideas!

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But it’s one thing to set a goal and an entirely different thing to actually achieve it, isn’t it? (If you've ever set a New Year's resolution only to realize a month later you have have already given up, you know what I mean!) In this week's video (above), I’m sharing the two-step process I use to not only set big goals, but to make consistent progress toward achieving them. 


Your 2-step career development assignment: First, think about the goal you want to accomplish over the next year. Perhaps you would like to enroll in an MBA program and be on your way to that advanced degree. Maybe you’d like to move to a warmer climate (away from our lovely Wisconsin winters!) and be working in a new position you're excited about. Or, it could be as simple as having a career you love rather than a job you tolerate, just to make the bills.


Whatever it is, once you have it clearly in mind, the next step is to identify the micro-steps that lead up to its successful completion. Think about what needs to happen in the next week, month, quarter, six months, nine months, and one year. Put each step, along with its appropriate deadline, into your calendar. As you accomplish each one and start to see the progress you are making, a goal that perhaps at one time felt impossible will start to seem very attainable.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page , an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Monday morning blues got you down?

August 17, 2017

Are you one of those folks who dread Monday morning? Your current job is not your “happy place” and you would probably rather do just about anything else than go to work? I know what a tough place that can be.


You might already be thinking it’s time for a career change, but let’s be honest, career transition takes time, sometimes several months. In this week’s video, I’m sharing a tip that will help you stay positive during this time of transition, despite your less-than-ideal work situation. 

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You see, when we intentionally do positive things for ourselves that bring us joy, they have a lasting impact on us. Even small and seemingly insignificant things will go a long way to helping us get through this time of career transition successfully. I believe the simple suggestions I share in this week’s video will inspire you.


Your career development assignment: This week, I invite you to do something for yourself that’s very intentional, that brings you joy, and then let me know about it! I would love to hear what you’ve tried and the impact you've experienced.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page , an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Be prepared for an effective job search: 

Tip 3 of 3

August 4, 2017

When asked about favorite activities to do in our spare time, most people would not list job searching as one of them. In fact, I’ve spoken with more than a few people over the years who shared that a main reason they’ve stayed in a particular job – even when they were not all that happy with it – was because they just didn’t want to have to go through to process of looking for something new. 

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I get it. Job searching can be a daunting task. However, with a little know-how and shift in perspective, it doesn’t have to be. This week’s video tip is the third and final in my current series dedicated to helping you prepare for a successful job search. 


The first two videos in this series talked about ways to put ourselves out there so job opportunities can find us. When they do, we want to be ready to quickly say “yay” or “nay” to each one which is why it’s important to become crystal clear on exactly what we want in our next position.


It’s time to shift our focus inward to understand our personal “why.”


Exactly what would compel us to move on from our current position (where, even though we don’t love it, we are probably somewhat comfortable)? Is it strictly about more income, or are there other factors, such as wanting more responsibility, or hoping to engage in a new industry and/or challenge? Create an exhaustive list of all of your "whys" and keep it handy. Then, the next time an opportunity is presented to you, refer to your list. Very quickly, you’ll know whether this is an opportunity worth pursuing, saving you time and energy in your job search.


Feeling stressed, underappreciated, or generally dissatisfied at work has a negative impact on our overall health and well being. I hope the ideas I’ve shared in today’s video and throughout this 3-part series will help pave the way toward a better, more fulfilling career path for you. It is absolutely possible to discover a career and life you love! 


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page , an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Be prepared for an effective job search: 

Tip 2 of 3

July 28, 2017

Embarking on a job search can be an overwhelming and daunting prospect for anyone, especially if it's been a few years (or more) since you've done one.


For this reason, I've created this 3-part video series devoted to helping you prepare for an effective and efficient job search. 

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Job search strategy Tip #2 is all about how leveraging your personal network can be just the leg up you need to access the best opportunities available.  The fact is, only about 80% of jobs that are available at any given time are ever posted anywhere, including online, in the newspaper (yes, some companies still use them!), or elsewhere. In order to have access to this vast majority of opportunities, we need to find them through other means.


Leveraging our personal network is a great strategy. Why use our personal connections for a professional endeavor? Because who better to help us find our next, perfect opportunity than the people who already know, like, and trust us. When asked, most people are more than happy to help out a friend if they can, and in the process they naturally become our personal job search advocates.


When we are unhappy at work, the negative effects ripple into all areas of our lives. Don't delay seeking out a better, more suitable opportunity simply because searching for a job is an unfamiliar practice. I believe the tip in today's video will increase your confidence and help set you up for success.  


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page , an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Be prepared for an effective job search: 

Tip 1 of 3

July 21, 2017

If you are like many of the clients I work with, you are probably unhappy in your current job and would like to make a career change. However, it’s been more than a few years since you’ve conducted a job search and – quite frankly – the whole process feels overwhelming.


While it is true that things have changed in the job search world in recent years, there are a few, simple things you can do to help you feel prepared and reduce those feelings of overwhelm.

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In the first of a series of 3 tips to help you prepare for a successful job search, I'm sharing the importance of having and maintaining an up-to-date LinkedIn profile.


As noted in this Market Watch article, hiring professionals will often pre-screen candidates on LinkedIn before ever inviting them in for an interview. If you don’t have a profile, or if you have one but it’s out of date, you may miss out on opportunities that you would otherwise be a great fit for.


LinkedIn makes creating and updating your profile an intuitive process. In fairly short order you can have a stand-out profile that showcases your skills, abilities, and experience.


An effective and efficient job search is one of the keys to having a career and life you love. I think the tip in today’s video will help you set yourself apart as a highly competitive candidate and move you one step closer to your dream of a new career.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page , an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Unlock ALL opportunities with this key

July 7, 2017

I know you want to have the career and life of your dreams. I want that for you too!


However, I'd be willing to bet that one of the reasons you haven't yet achieved this goal has something to do with your current level of self-confidence.


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It's something I also struggled with earlier in my career, and many clients I’ve worked with have identified a lack of self-confidence as one of their biggest obstacles to moving forward with a career change. In fact, they've shared that they chose to work with me because they were ready to bring their self-confidence into alignment with their true skills and abilities.


In the video above, I'm sharing a super simple trick that you can use starting today to help you begin to build your self-confidence, too. If you’ve ever experienced a lay-off, termination, being passed over for a promotion, or not getting the job offer (even though you were certain the interview went great), you probably understand how quickly self-confidence can be shaken.


I believe by using the tip in today’s video you will experience a resurgence of self-confidence and be much better prepared to take the next big step in your career.


As always, I would love to hear how you are planning to use this tip and what your next steps in your career progression would be. Please share your thoughts with me through my contact page , an email, or a phone call.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth



Hate your job? Laid off? Retired but want more?

April 11, 2017

There are many reasons we find ourselves wanting or needing a new job. While the prospect of starting something new can be exciting, for many individuals it can also be terrifying. And if it’s been more than a few years since your last job search, you probably feel overwhelmed with the process.


Where to start?  Make a list. A great first step is to make a list of the things you both enjoyed and disliked about your previous jobs. What are the common themes? What would you do again even if you didn’t get paid? What do you want to avoid no matter how much it pays? This simple process can help you narrow down the types of positions to research further and those you can skip entirely.


Next step? Research. Once you have an idea of what you want to do next, do some research. One beneficial activity is to connect with someone already doing that job and “pick their brain.” This exercise, called informational interviewing, can reveal aspects about the position that you would otherwise never know. If you come away from that meeting feeling excited and wanting more, you know you are on the right track. If you feel the opposite, you know you need to keep researching. Either way, you are now one step further in the process.


Don't forget! Update your materials. Nothing will put a stop to an efficient job  search faster than a resume with typos and a cover letter that is off target. Be sure to make the necessary updates to your resume, customize your cover letter, and then proof read them both before submitting anywhere. When you've completed your review, have at least one other person give them a once-over as well. A second set of eyes will inevitably catch a typo or two that you missed. 


Want to learn more? Making a career change is a big decision! If you or someone you know is ready for to make a change but are overwhelmed with the process, please contact me. I would love to see if I can help.


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Is your resume out of date?

April 14, 2017

If it's been a few years (or more) since you dusted off your resume, chances are pretty good that you have an “Objective” statement at the top.  It may read something along the lines of, “Objective: To obtain a position as a [fill in the blank with the name of the position you are applying for].


Look familiar? Don’t worry. Not long ago objective statements were widely accepted resume openers. (I used to have one on mine, too). The problem with these types of statements in today’s job market is that they tell the recruiter something they already know. This equates to you wasting both time and space: time during a recruiter's already very busy day; and space on your resume when you could have included something valuable about your experience that the recruiter would be genuinely interested in.


I know what your thinking. Everyone you've ever talked with about how to write a resume told you to clearly indicate exactly what you are applying for so the recruiter or hiring manager understands why they should be interested in you. And they were correct to give you this advice. However, what they didn't tell you was that in today's largely computerized application process a better way to use the top section of your resume is to include keywords. 


Many companies today use online applicant tracking systems (ATS) to collect resumes. When an applicant submits a resume for an open position and has used keywords well, the recruiter will find their resume using those keywords, not a generic objective statement. For example, if the position description stated they are seeking a candidate with data analysis experience, and in your resume you indicated in a past position you conducted data analysis, there is a good chance your resume will be flagged by the ATS when they do a search for ideal candidates. 


Also, if you wrote a compelling cover letter you opened by enthusiastically stating how thrilled you are to apply for their open [fill in the blank] position and then proceeded to use keywords throughout your cover letter. Since you're cover letter is attached to your online application, the ATS will pick these words up as well when asked to search from them by the recruiter. If for some reason you did not write a cover letter because they didn't specifically ask for one, go back and see if you can add one to your application after the fact. Cover letters, even when not required, can be a hugely valuable asset during the candidate selection process. (Stay tuned for a future article on why this is true).


So, what to do with the opening section of your resume then? Simple. Replace your objective with a “Professional Profile." This is a series of 3-5 brief statements or bullet points that clearly and succinctly communicate your experience and the value you offer. The best profile statements are full of powerful action verbs and incorporate keywords found in the position description. Make this one, simple change to your resume and you will immediately engage a recruiter and compel them to read on.


If you are unsure how to create a resume that truly sells you as a highly marketable candidate, please contact me. I have helped hundreds of job seekers craft resumes that resulted in job interviews that lead to job offers. I will reach back out to set up a brief call to get acquainted and see if I can help you get those same results!


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Logo Lessons

April 18, 2017

It's amazing what we can learn from seemingly ordinary things. For me, an incredibly valuable lesson came as a result of ordering and finalizing my logo earlier this year.


To be fully transparent, I had been procrastinating getting it done. It sat on my "to-do" list for months, actually. As a consequence, having it incomplete was preventing me from moving forward on several other important projects and tasks. 


And then, something amazing happened! During a 2-day seminar that I attended with other small business owners someone said to me, "What are you waiting for? Just get it done!" When hearing it put this way, I took the message to heart. I reached out to a graphic designer during our lunch break, described what I was looking for, and - voila! - within 72 hours I had gone from no-logo-in-sight to the finalized version. A task that had been weighing on me for quite some time was done inside of 1 week, clearing the way to start new projects that had been on hold. 


Are you avoiding taking a step toward a new career in the same way I was avoiding the task of creating my logo?  You know it's important, yet you take no action because you are afraid that somehow you will get it wrong. Rather than put yourself out there and take a risk, you are staying where it feels comfortable and safe. And even though it's simultaneously making you miserable, you choose to stay in that spot, resulting in this unfinished task weighing on you. Heavily.


What we choose to do for a living is an extremely important decision that has ripple effect consequences in our lives. I completely understand wanting to take a "proceed with caution" attitude toward a making a change. The trick is to make sure we do, in fact, proceed and not allow ourselves to remain stuck in a job that we don't love. 


Perhaps making a career change feels like too big of a task to tackle on your own. If you are like most professionals I know, you are extremely busy so even if are ready to make a change, it probably doesn't feel like you have the time. (The reason my logo finally got done was because I asked someone who knew far more than me about graphic design for help). 


I would be honored to be the "logo designer" of your career change. If you know you are ready for a new career, please contact me. I will reach back out to set up a time for us to chat and see if can help. 


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

 3 Steps to a Great Interview

May 4, 2017

"Raise your hand if you love to go on job interviews."


(I can hear the crickets chirping).


I would pose this to students when I taught a college course on career development and job searching. During my four years of teaching the class, invariably, no one ever raised their hand.


But its OK - that's actually what I was hoping for.


It was, and still is, my favorite way to introduce the topic of job interviews. Why? Two reasons. First, having a dislike for job interviews is common to our human experience. I have found it helps people to become more comfortable with the prospect of a job interview when they remember they are not alone in feeling nervous, afraid, or insecure about it. Second, it creates an excellent jumping off point on how to best prepare and decrease those nervous, fearful, and insecure feelings.


Here are three easy things you can do to help yourself be well-prepared for your next interview:


First, research the company. Give yourself a competitive edge by taking time to review the organization’s website and become familiar with their mission, values, customer needs, and any current/recent events. Once you have a thorough understanding of each, create a short list of questions about how the position you are applying for fits with each of these important items. These types of questions will demonstrate your desire and drive to hit the ground running should you be offered the position.


Second, prepare how you will answer their questions. Even though you may not have the exact questions they’ll ask, you already know the right answers; they come from your past work experiences.

Spend some time recalling examples from your work history. When did you solve a problem, help out beyond your job duties, or deliver exceptional customer service? These experiences will be perfect answers for behavioral or situational questions, which are commonly used in interviews. When they are fresh in your mind, you are much less likely to get tongue-tied when you need to provide an answer. Remember to use the STAR method when formulating your answers.


Finally, be sure to do steps 1 and 2. No, really! I cannot emphasize enough the importance of each. In my experience, spending time both researching the company and preparing answers is often overlooked. I have heard from so many job-seekers over the years that they believe they "do better" at an interview when they “wing it.” Or sometimes, the concern is they will "over-prepare” and come across as "too rehearsed" or "too confident."


I’m happy to let you know that none of these things are true. In the many, many, conversations I have had with recruiters over the years, not once have I heard a complaint that a candidate was “too prepared.” In fact, when it is obvious that a candidate has done their homework, holds a clear understanding of the organization, and is ready to explain exactly how and why they are a perfect fit for the position, recruiters are impressed, (relieved!), and excited to hear more.


Follow these steps and you are sure to impress your next interviewer. But, i f all of this feels overwhelming, don't worry, you do not have to go it alone! I would love to see if I can help you gain confidence and raise your job search acumen. I offer a FREE "get acquainted" call so you can see if working with me is the right fit for you. Please contact me ; I will reach back out to set up a time for us to chat and see if can help. 


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Top 10 Things Recruiters Want You To Know

May 23, 2017

Staffing agencies are an important part of any savvy job seeker's tool box. They often provide the back, side, or only door into certain companies who choose to outsource their recruitment process. As such, recruiters have a wealth of information about how to best navigate a successful job search.


Multiple recruiters from a local staffing agency generously shared their best tips for a successful job search. This list is based on their many interactions with candidates over the years.


So, without further ado, here are the "Top 10 Things Recruiters Want You To Know."


#10: Recruiters are not "job fairies."

Recruiters need to find the right candidate for the job, and aren't in a position to create a certain job just because a job seeker would appreciate it. Work with your recruiter to position yourself well for what is available within a company. If it turns out it's not the best fit for you, don't take it personally. Thank them for the opportunity and quickly move on to the next.


#9: Know what you are looking for in your next position.

Candidates sometimes say they are "open to anything" in the hopes of landing something sooner rather than later. While you likely have the best of intentions, this typically leads a recruiter to think you have no clue what you want in your next job and are relying on them to make a career decision for you. It's great to be flexible on some items, but be sure to have a general direction in mind.


#8: Follow directions.

As a job seeker, you want to demonstrate you are a solid candidate who is dependable and reliable long before you are sitting at your new desk. So, if a recruiter asks you to submit hiring paperwork by a certain date so you can move forward in the process (for example), be sure to submit the paperwork by the date requested. Failing to follow directions at this stage of the game can put a quick stop to your candidacy.


#7: Base your salary requirements on your skills and experience.

Candidates will sometimes attempt to negotiate a pay range because it's "what they need to pay their bills" or because they just earned a college degree. The truth is, these are not compelling enough reasons to pay any candidate a certain salary. Do your research on the typical pay range for the type of position and your experience using a website such as www.salary.com, and bring this information to the negotiation table. When you can justify asking for a certain salary based on industry norms you will have a lot more bargaining power.


#6: Demonstrate professionalism at each interaction.

When talking with any member of office staff to set up an interview or discuss job details, be professional and courteous. Sometimes candidates will think "it's just a phone conversation, not an interview," and leave their good manners behind. Don't make this mistake. Treat everyone you interact with throughout the hiring process with dignity and respect, from the front desk worker who checked you in all the way to the GM or CEO.


#5: Be truthful, but know when enough is enough.

Sometimes this fine line trips candidates up. On the one hand, you need to be honest about whether or not you were fired from a previous job. On the other hand, you want to avoid revealing personal details about your life even if they relate to the reason you were terminated. Tell the employer what they need to know, and then stop. If they want additional details, they will ask for them.


#4: Be friendly, but not too friendly.

A few do's and don'ts: Do follow the company's page on LinkedIn; Don't send the interviewer a Facebook friend request. Do send a short thank you note in the mail after the interview; Don't hand deliver the thank you note and then ask to speak with the interviewer. Do shake their hand after an interview; Don't try to give them a hug... (you get the idea).


#3: Be on time for interviews.

Don't rely on your GPS alone to make sure you can find the location of the interview day of. If possible, do a dry run the day before to make sure you know exactly where to go. Plan ahead for potential traffic delays as well.


#2: Don't be too early, either.

It's great that you want to make a good first impression by not being late, but being any more than 10 minutes early can be just as bad. The interviewer is likely working on tasks right up until the time they are scheduled to meet with you and when you arrive too early you run the risk of making them feel rushed. They may also question whether or not you had the time correct. If you arrive more than 10 minutes early, take time to review your notes in your car, use the restroom, and then check in at the appropriate time.


#1: BE PREPARED.

Of the recruiters who contributed to this article, nothing was mentioned more often than the importance of being prepared. Being prepared helps the interviewer see you as a valuable asset to the team, and this is the exact impression you want to make. A few ways you can demonstrate you are prepared include: bringing extra copies of your resume and references; researching the company ahead of time; knowing how to get to the company so you can be on time (see above); having questions prepared that you want to ask the interviewer; and understanding why you are a great fit for the position.

There you have it! Follow these tips and you are sure to impress your next recruiter and interviewer.


Does all of this feel overwhelming? Don't worry - you do not have to go it alone! I would love to see if I can help you gain confidence and raise your job search acumen. I offer a FREE "get acquainted" call so you can see if working with me is the right fit for you. Please contact me ; I will reach back out to set up a time for us to chat and see if can help. 


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Feeling Stuck in a Job You Hate?

May 31, 2017

It might be time to pack up your skills and transfer them to something new.


Raise your hand if any of the following statements sound familiar:


“I haven’t looked for a job in years and job searching has changed so much; where do I even start?”


“I am so miserable working at this company but I don’t know how to do anything else – I’m trapped.”


“I wish I could do what I really love, but I don’t even know if such a job exists. I guess I’m stuck where I am.”


If you’ve heard yourself saying anything similar to these statements, I bet you would love to make a career change but feel stuck or trapped in your current situation. I know from experience what a tough spot that is. I also know that, with collaborative support and the right approach, each of these statements can lead to wonderful new beginnings.


Here’s what I mean...


All of us, no matter what job or industry we’ve worked in, have a set of skills that are applicable across multiple industries. In the hiring world, these are referred to as “transferable skills.” Transferable skills are applicable in multiple roles because they are not industry-specific.


Here is a super-quick, rapid-fire list of some common transferable skills:

  • Customer Service
  • Project management
  • Training
  • Budgeting
  • Meeting facilitation
  • Scheduling
  • Peer support
  • Administration
  • Client follow-up

In this short list alone, the power of transferable skills is evident. These skills could have been gained in any industry, from road construction to corporate finance, and in multiple roles, from Administrative Assistant to Department Director. Likewise, they can be re-applied in any industry, in many different types of roles.


Quite often, the first step to getting unstuck is to make a thorough list of your transferable skills. You will quickly see that you have much more to offer than you are giving yourself credit for. And when you get to the point of sitting in that interview chair, you will be ready to list exactly how and why you are a perfectly qualified candidate for the job.


Would you benefit from working with someone who can help you identify your transferable skills and exactly how they can help you find your dream job? I would love to see if I can help! I offer a FREE "get acquainted" call so you can see if working with me is the right fit for you. Please contact me ; I will reach back out to set up a time for us to chat and see if can help. 


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Is fear of failure stealing your future success?

June 12, 2017

“Go confidently in the directions of your dreams. Live the life you’ve imagined.” ~ Henry David Thoreau


Throughout 2007 and into 2008, I read this quote many times over. Now that my youngest kiddo was old enough for elementary school, I was wrestling with how to take the next step in my career. I knew in my heart I had more to offer the world than what I was currently doing in my part-time job, but I was scared to follow my dream of becoming a self-employed career coach and resume writer.


The unknown is always a little scary, of course, but this seemed like scary on a whole new level. Even though I had the right set of skills and abilities, I was contemplating moving my career in a direction outside of my formal education. Additionally, I didn’t personally know anyone else who did similar work, leaving me without a framework to use as a model. Finally, my dream career involved self-employment, which (as you might imagine) comes with inherent financial risks.


However, if I’m being completely honest, one thing scared me more than anything else: the prospect of failing.


My fear of failure nearly stopped me before I even started. Fear is a powerful emotion that, left unchecked, can keep us from realizing our full potential. If we never realize our full potential, we risk living a life of dissatisfaction and regret.


So how do we move forward toward our dreams despite fearing failure? In my experience, the answer in large part is to build up our confidence: confidence in ourselves, our skills, and our abilities.


Thankfully, confidence is something that can be proactively cultivated. Here are a few tips that worked well for me and have also worked for many of my clients:


#1: Inventory your skills and abilities. Most of us have a set of work-related skills we excel at, such as time management, or things we are proud to have learned and mastered over time, such as performing data analysis. Eventually, these things become second-nature to us. As a result, in our minds they may no longer seem noteworthy. But the fact is, they absolutely are!

  • Put it into action: Sit down and make an exhaustive list of every single skill and ability you possess. When you’re done, have someone you trust read it over to make sure you haven’t missed anything (since we tend to short-change ourselves and be our own worst critics, an outside review is extremely valuable). Review this comprehensive list daily to remind yourself of your unique and awesome gifts – a natural confidence booster.

#2: Keep a personal “Kudos!” folder. Throughout our professional lives, there are various ways our work is praised and recognized. Things like high scores in an annual performance review, thank-you cards or emails from customers, or formal awards for reaching company goals are all undeniable proof that our skills are valuable and, therefore, marketable.

  • Put it into action: Start a file or folder labeled “Kudos!” and keep it in a safe spot. When you receive any type of written recognition for a job well done, put a copy of it in this folder. The next time you sense that fear of failure is shaking your confidence and getting in your way of moving forward, read the contents of this folder. Being reminded of your previous successes will build your confidence and help pave the way for continued success.

#3: Ask for help. There is an old saying that “a burden shared is a burden halved.” This article explains how a recent research study demonstrated that feelings of stress and fear are reduced when we share how we feel with another person who has had a similar experience. Knowing we are not alone in our fear has a profound therapeutic effect.

  • Put it into action: Find someone you can trust to talk with about your fears, goals, and desire for a better future. Ideally, this person understands what you are going through because they have been there before, and hearing their perspective can be invaluable. Therapists, professional counselors, and business coaches are all great individuals to seek out.

When we successfully reduce our fear, we create space for confidence to grow. And as our confidence grows, we are ultimately better poised to follow Thoreau’s advice and truly “live the life we imagine.”


Would you benefit from working with someone who can help you overcome fear and build your confidence? I would love to see if I can help! I would love to see if I can help! I offer a FREE "get acquainted" call so you can see if working with me is the right fit for you. Please contact me; I will reach back out to set up a time for us to chat and see if can help. 


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Is perfectionism keeping you from moving forward?

June 23, 2017

Perfectionism. The notion that we will wait until something is "perfect" before we take action on it. It seems like a good practice in theory, right? However, it typically leads to tasks staying on our to-do list, projects never getting further than the idea stage, and progress toward our goals stalled out.


Sound familiar? Don't worry. You are so. NOT. Alone. 


To be fully transparent with you, I've been known to allow my own perfectionism to lead to procrastination, which in turn has meant forward momentum toward certain goals simply didn't occur.


Here's a perfect example: one of my goals for 2017 is to share content regularly via video. However, until today (which, as you know, is 6 months into the year) the number of videos I've shared is...wait for it...zero.


Why zero, you ask? Because of my perfectionism, of course! You see, video is new for me and I'm not familiar with it. And if I'm not familiar with something, I probably won't do it all that well the first time, let alone perfectly. So, rather than do something less than perfectly, I tend to default to not doing it at all, or taking for-ev-er to get it done. *sigh*


Don't worry - there IS a happy ending to this story - promise!


About a month ago I realized, once again, I was allowing my perfectionism to delay my forward momentum with using video. Rather than stumbling along and trying to figure it all out on my own (which would have delayed me even further) I committed to doing two things: 1) asking for help, and 2) taking an "imperfect action." I called on two of my wonderful friends and colleagues who have experience with video production; I let them know what I had in mind; we set a date later that week to record; and - voila! Video project #1 is complete - whoo-hoo!!


So today, I am uber-excited that my very first video project is now live on my new website page  "Interview with Elizabeth." Be sure to check it out!


Remember: if the prospect of making a career change leaves you feeling stalled out because of your own perfectionism, you do not have to go it alone! I would love to see if I can help. I offer a FREE "get acquainted" call so you can see if working with me is the right fit for you. Please contact me; I will reach back out to set up a time for us to chat. 


To your success!

~ Elizabeth

Are you ready to create your better future?

Contact me to schedule a free consultation. I would love to see if I can help!

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